Synchronizing AAD Security Groups with Office 365 Groups

Security groups are often used to protect access to resources, but they can’t be used to control membership for Office 365 Groups or Teams. If you want to use AAD security groups to control membership for Groups and Teams, you need to come up with a way to synchronize. PowerShell is available to do the job, and as it turns out, it’s not too difficult.

Office 365 Groups and the ProvisioningOption property

Some will tell you that you can figure out what resources an Office 365 Group is connected to by checking the ProvisioningOption property with the Get-UnifiedGroup cmdlet. Well, you can’t. If you want to do something like check for team-enabled groups, you’ll need a different approach.

Office 365 Audit Records Truncated for Azure Active Directory Events

A demo to show how easy it is to use PowerShell to manage Office 365 Groups and Teams was progressing nicely at the UK Evolve conference when a problem happened with code that used to run perfectly. Sounds like a normal programming situation, but in this case, Microsoft had changed the format of Office 365 audit records for Azure Active Directory operations. That’s not so good. What’s worse is that some essential data is now missing from the audit records.

Enabling Access to Teams for Guest Users with PowerShell

During transitions, things sometimes don’t go so smoothly. Such is the case if you want to enable or disable guest user access to Teams and find that the setting to control the access is no longer available in the Office 365 Admin Center. But PowerShell can control the setting, so that’s the solution to the problem.